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INFORMATION GATHERING: EXTRACTING RELEVANT INFORMATION, SUMMARIZING,  PARAPHRASING, ETC. 

Keeley library 7/4/2000
See also related topics:
  • Understanding Media: Advertising 
  • Evaluating Web Resources
  • Documenting Sources
  • Media: Film and Video 
  • Information Resources: 
  • Focusing 
  • Using Note Cards
  • INFORMATION GATHERING GUIDE

    INITIAL STRATEGIES
    CONSIDER THE SOURCE
    BE  SELECTIVE
    BE EFFICIENT

    INITIAL STRATEGIES

    Brainstorm all possible resources that might be used to address the topic:
  • Reference Materials
  • Books 
  • Newspapers
  • Periodicals, 
  • Internet
  • Interviews
  • Surveys 
  • Experiments, 
  • Etc.

  • See also:
  • Using Information Resources :  Questions
  • Using Information Resources: Suggestions
  • Brainstorm those resources that might  be appropriate for the topic. Example:
    For: 
    debates, 
    discussions, 
    persuasive essays, 
    and other projects involving varying viewpoints, 
    include: 
    magazines, 
    newspapers, and 
    issue web sites
    See also:
  • Using Information Resources :  Questions
  • Using Information Resources: Suggestions
  • Pursue variety
    Don't limit research to only one kind of resource.
    Prepare your search
    Write down key words that might be used before you begin your research.

    CONSIDER THE SOURCE

  • Determine authorship for all resources 
  • Identify points of agreement and disagreement among sources. 
  • Evaluate information for stereotyping, prejudice, and misrepresentation. 
  • Distinguish among fact, opinion, point of view, and inference.
  • Evaluate graphic images for misleading presentation and manipulated data. 
  • Retain only appropriate material.
  • See also :
    Who What When...
  • Understanding Media: Film and Video... 
  • Understanding Media: Advertising
  • Evaluating Web Resources

  •  

    BE  SELECTIVE

  • Question others. Listen actively.
  • Read for significant details and concepts.
  • View for significant details and concepts
  • Extract appropriate details and concepts
  • Analyze information relative to need.
  • Select information clearly related to the problem or question.
  • See also related topics:
  • Focusing 
  • Using Graphic Organizers
  • Creating Graphic Organizers on a Computer

  •  

      BE EFFICIENT- Some techniques for extracting relevant  information:

    Read information and write down notes on note cards. This is usually the best method if you are working on a large project, such as a research report.. 
    See: Using Note Cards
    Print out or photocopy information and then use a pencil or highlighter pen to highlight important parts. Save information to disk, and then change the text color of the important information.. This can later be copied into digital note cards using a database or spreadsheet program. Copy selected information directly into a word processor as you are reading the document. Be certain to give proper credit:

    See: Documenting sources

    Note: No matter which technique you decide to use, be certain to give proper credit for the work or others.
     
     

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    REFERENCE BOOKS

    Writer's Inc.  is an excellent book with the following pertinent chapters on extracting relevant information. 
    Ref. 808.02 K32 2001
  • Use specialized reference tools, both in the library and online
  • Determine when to use general or specialized print and electronic reference tools.     pp. 323-349
  • Construct effective search strategies and manual searches using keywords, Boolean logic and limiters. pp. 333, 339

  • These examples may help you decide. You also need to consider copyright date, and subject. Science and health topics will often require more recent periodical, news or web sources.
  • Extract the most relevant information. Distinguishing between fact and point of view.  Detect misleading graphic presentations    pp. 445, 446  
  • These examples help you use evidence and logic to detect the most common fallacies of thinking when reading or viewing.   Viewing Skills;  pp.448, 449    Watching TV news 
    p.p.452          Watching commercials,
    p. 453            Viewing web sites 

    SELECTED INTERNET RESOURCES

    Critically evaluating information sources
    Statistics Every Writer Should Know Quoting, paraphrasing, summarizing from Purdue OWL
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    Jane Constant, Reference Librarian
    Keeley Library, B.M.C.Durfee High School of Fall River
    September, 1978  to  June, 2001